Holy Interruptions

Click here to read Acts 9:1-20.

We have all had those days. Days when we are so focused on completing our job that we do not pay much attention to anything else around us. It can be very easy for “workaholics” to be so engrossed in the day to day tasks and work that we may not take the time to ask, “Is this really what I need to be doing?”

The Apostle Paul had one of those days before his encounter with the risen Christ on the road to Damascus. Remember, Saul (Paul) was at Stephen’s stoning and approved of his death. He was on a mission to try and destroy the lives of the followers of Jesus by seeking them out and arresting them. It appears he was so focused on the task at hand that it took something outrageous to get him to listen to the voice of Jesus and hear his message. That is what happened on his way to Damascus.

Don’t we get like this too? Truthfully many people do not stop going on the path their on until they hit a wall they can’t break. Until something detrimental, destructive, or something outrageous happens that gets their attention. Illness, news, or anything can get our attention quickly. When this happens, we hopefully pay attention and change our habits, our lives in order to do what needs to be done after the event.

Paul (Saul is his Jewish name) was blinded by a bright light. He was unable to see for a few days later. The light caught his attention and he listened. Did he believe the words of Jesus right at first? I bet after Saul heard Jesus say who he was, he was terrified. He is speaking and listening to someone they had killed on a cross! That would get my attention.

Paul had a “holy interruption” in his life. This was an event that turned his life around to become the Apostle Paul that wrote most of the New Testament we have today. After his encounter with Jesus Christ, he was completely different. He wasn’t focused on his work before this encounter anymore; he was completely focused on the mission God called him to – the mission to preach to the Gentiles (non-Jewish people) about the Good News of Jesus Christ.

I have a question for each of us today. “Are we more focused and excited about the work we do to make a living for our families or the work that God is calling us to in the world?” Some people may be able to answer a simple yes because both sides of the question are aligned already. But for those who look at their work as something they do to make money, and then “try to be a good Christian,” why do we live double lives like this? The energy that takes will wear us out and we won’t be able to be as effective as we need to be in either area of our lives.

Instead, I invite you to memorize this scripture and apply it to your life.

Colossians 3:17

“Whatever you do, whether in speech or action, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus and give thanks to God the Father through him.”

You are also invited to read this 6 part devotional: Office Hours Devotional

QUESTIONS:

  1. Why do you think we work so hard?
  2. Who is it easier to work for our own glory rather than that of Jesus Christ?

Normal Life

Mark 10:1 “Jesus left that place and went beyond the Jordan and into the region of Judea. Crowds gathered around him again and, as usual, he taught them.”

This month we are looking at the 10th chapter in the Gospel of Mark. As we begin this new series, I invite you to open your heart and see what God may be speaking to you through the Scripture. (Click here for the sermon on Mark 1:1-16)

Reading through Mark 10 and you can see some difficult passages. Divorce, adultery, rich man told to leave behind possessions, figuring out who is the greatest and a blind beggar.

But today, we get to pause in the first verse.

Think about your normal day. What does it involve? Waking up, breakfast, going to work, lunch, going home, dinner, trying to relax, bed, and then start all over? Any memorable conversations?

I think what we do in our day to day lives is of more importance than anything we do. Our habits are formed, health, etc. These are the moments when we are living real life. Life is the little moments we do daily. We do not have to go out of our way to say we’re “living life.”

I love the line, “And crowds gathered around him; and, as was his custom, he taught them.” Jesus’ “normal” life was being surrounded by people. It was very hard to schedule who he could meet with because you never knew who would show up. But he did not let that stop him. His details he had to do each day were in the midst of talking and teaching people. He taught them about the Kingdom of God.

Imagine how our lives would be if we made this our priority. Everything we do would certainly give God glory (like Colossians 3:17 says it should); and we would lead people to see and experience the Living God.

Jesus’ “normal” day was not written in a schedule, it was being where he needed to be. We have our days scheduled, but what if the people we meet with and talk with are the very people God had scheduled for us to meet? Maybe we need to hear what they have to say. Maybe, just maybe, our normal day is more special than we realize.